Skip to main content

Marketing in times of disengagement


Welcome to the age of disengagement. An era where people don't invest time, effort or emotions at work, home, politics, or religion. They have lost faith in the system. Perhaps, the inequality gap and dysfunctional politics are sucking up all the energy from society. Instead, people are taking actions on their own and holding business accountable to higher standards.
This trend impacts culture, business, and every day life.
According to Gallup research, 7 out of 10 employees aren't engaged in their work at the office. To say it more directly and through the words of the comedian George Clarin, "most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough money not to quit." People want to earn a good living while doing work that matters.
There's also disengagement in people's personal lives. As a result of high divorce rates, the isolating feeling of loneliness has risen to 65%, a number that has continuously increased over the past ten years. Research has found that loneliness carries the same mortality risk as smoking and damages your health two times more than obesity does.
In politics, defections from political parties have doubled in the past 50 years, which is largely because political parties can't seem to agree on anything. Seemingly so, politicians would rather shut down the government than make a compromise for the well-being of the country. So, voters think: why bother?
Disengagement has engulfed society, which poses a huge challenge for marketers. How do we engage with people who don't want to be engaged? Think about it.
Only brands that have a high sense of purpose or that will improve our lives or the world will survive. Today, 63% of consumers only buy products and services that appeal to their beliefs, values or ideals according to GFK.
Having a sense purpose is not about tweeting, sharing pictures in histograms or posting videos on Facebook to celebrate the moment. It is about brands putting their money where their mouth is. And providing tangibles products and services that impact our lives.
Introducing mandatory minimum global maternity policy. On March 2015, UK-based telecoms group Vodafone announced that it would define a mandatory minimum maternity benefits standard in all 30 countries in which it operates.
Opening co-working space and cafe for entrepreneurs. In February 2015, Warsaw's Idea Bank's city center branch was styled as a café and staffed by baristas. The retail bank's coffee shop and workspace were opened to attract small business owners away from local cafés, offering free beverages, offices, and bookable meeting rooms.
Providing free subway tickets offered in exchange for exercise. January 2015: The Mexican government installed 30 motion-sensitive machines at subway stations across Mexico City. The machines issued a token that could be redeemed for a subway ticket (which usually costs five pesos) to any commuter who completes ten squats. 
Meaningful actions are the only way to get people's attention within a sea of content. Only meaningful actions will get people to engage and talk about your brand. Only meaningful action will get people to buy your brand. In times of disengagement, having a high sense of purpose means everything.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Aim for Love, Not Likes

Love is an unconditional emotion while like is a more watered-down version of love. Loving someone means that he or she means everything to you while liking someone implies that you are only happy being with that person. Love involves deeper, stronger emotions, while like is more of a tender feeling towards that special someone. In a world of infinite choices, love is everything. Like is a nice to have.  Today, we live in a world of abundance, where people intent to create content surpass their time to consume it. Video content is much easier and cheaper to produce than at any other time in history. YouTube sees 400 hours of video uploaded every minute. Facebook has more than 250,000 status updates in the same span. We could never read and see everything online.  With unlimited possibilities and limited time, we pay sustainable attention to what we love and divided attention to what we like. We spend hours watching Homeland and give our divided attention to our news feed on Facebook. …

Adidas kills TV. Now, let’s debate

The News: Adidas is ditching TV for digital. The company is looking to boost its e-commerce revenues from $1.06 billion in 2016 to $4.25 billion by 2020 — and Adidas wants to use digital channels to get there. The Rationale: Fish where the fish are. Younger consumers don't watch TV anymore. They spend most of their time on their mobile devices. The Controversy: Why do they want to ditch a medium that is allegedly more "critical" to the brand and that generates more sales than digital? Here we have the Debate between TV and digital: Media Consumption TV: People are watching TV now more than ever.  Digital: People are consuming media more than ever, but mostly through digital devices. The Fact: In 2017, people are projected to spend 6 hours on digital – with the majority being mobile devices - while only spending 4 hours consuming television according to the eMarketer forecast. Younger viewers watch 2.5 times more internet video than TV. Consumers aged 13-24 watch 12.1 hours …

Winter and Summer in Adland

It is winter in Adland.  We have moved from a world of scarcity to a world of abundance and algorithms.  We have lost the power of influence. Trust has been severely damaged.  Consumer attention is the new bottleneck. We no longer decide who sees us. Instead, we get picked.  30 second is not enough anymore. We need to take consumers through a scenic journey to create a long lasting relationship.  Everyone is a publisher. It is easier than ever to create, but harder than ever to make a hit.  The impulse to make has far outrun the desire to consume.  New forces have emerged in the form of sophisticated algorithms.  A new model has surfaced called "pay per play,” which scored everything we do on relevance to feeding the machine. It decides what gets picked, when, and where, based on extreme relevancy.  Mass media has vanished. Precision and personalization have emerged.  It is winter in Adland. The good days are all long gone.  It is Summer in Adland We now have the power to make bra…