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Showing posts from December, 2015

Marketing and The Content Machine in 2016

Today, we cannot have a marketing meeting without talking about content marketing. It has become a silver bullet for all marketing problems. Every brand wants to be a publisher in some shape or form, and the newsroom is the latest shiny object. People don't pay attention to ads. So instead of doing more of the same, we sponsor content that might engage people. It sounds like a smart move, right? The only problem is that content is an abundant resource. Everyone is doing it;94% of small businesses, 93% of B2Bs, and 77% of B2Cs use content marketing.Unless you are creating something unique, you are just adding to the sea of content. Brands have a better shot to standing out by focusing on originality than by following the pack (e.g., sponsoring articles, whitepapers, how-to guides). It's more interesting and better business. According to Wikipedia, content marketing is any marketing that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content to acquire and retain cus…

The New Social Reality

Today, people have two lives, their online lives and their offline lives. Online life represents the good side; it is always thriving and beautiful. Offline life has ups and downs. As technology becomes more human, these two lives become one, creating a new social reality. We cannot longer split our feelings, thoughts, and actions between these two worlds. This time, the digital is for real. We are social animals. We need to be part of our social environment. We are good at monitoring public opinion so that we can fit in. We try to present an enlarged version of ourselves online through selfies or cool pictures. We keep silent whenever we disagree with prevailing views. We send happy emojis even though we don't feel happy. However, this virtual reality has a dark side: social pressure. Exposure to other people's lives can leave us feeling less successful and even frustrated over our own lives. There is pressure to portray an inflated version of ourselves so we can try to fit …

Will Live Integration Drive Brand Engagement in 2016?

Sharing a recent interview that I did with OgilvyOne NewYork on what to expect in brand strategy and engagement in 2016. You can visit our blog, Sell or Else, for more resources on customer engagement.  OgilvyOne: From a brand strategy and engagement perspective, what was hot in 2015? Brea: 2014 was about content marketing. People are not paying attention to ads. So instead of giving more of the same, we were, and are still trying, to provide something of higher perceived value in the form of content. 2015 has been about contextual marketing, which bases communications on the place and the situation the consumer is in. Today, 77% of content is consumed through interactive devices. So even though we are still pushing communications through mass media, people are engaging with the content on their mobile devices in a way that’s personal and contextually relevant. OO: How is this forecasted to change in 2016?

What this year top movies tells about Pop Culture?

If many people like something, it has cultural value. If a movie appeals to millions of people, the movie has a closer relation to society. As the year comes to an end, I looked at the top movies of 2015 to get a feeling for what is resonating in our community. This year, Jurassic World, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, The Avengers: Age of the Ultron, Spectre, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2, Furious 7, and Minions have dominated the box office.  Most of these movies share the same formula, which hit close to home: A tale of criminal organizations or big corporations in the quest for absolute power through the use of advanced technology, data, and force to establish a new world order. To counter the dark side, we have a few good souls going rogue—they no longer adhere to protocol and instead do something else of their own volition—to fight them for the well-being of the society. In Jurassic World, we have the Marashi Global Corporation, which also owns InGen, the genetic company tha…

What's your 2016 conversation strategy?

There isn't a marketing meeting that goes by without the mention of content marketing. It's a silver bullet for all marketing problems as people are blocking or not paying attention to ads. So instead of giving the same content and in the same way, we are trying to give something of value instead, which is a well-intended attempt to overcome the problem at hand. But it needs something else. The challenge is that digital is a live channel, not a static one and content without conversation is a one-way street. To build a relationship with our audience, we need to move beyond content and get into a conversation and truly engage them.  I understand that many people might consider content and conversation to be one in the same, but I dare to differ. We can push all of the content in the world and still not have a conversation. Newspapers and publishers do that in their print and TV and, to some extent, in digital. Today, most of the media is interactive. The expectation is for peo…

The People Economy

As this year comes to an end, we are all trying to predict what's going to be "hot" in 2016.  I've already heard a few terms and buzzwords like hyperconnectivity and micro-moment floating around. And while there is truth in all of these trends, they're all heavily focused on the technology side. I think there's another angle that we are overlooking: the human side.  I believe that next year is going to be about the person, not the brand or the corporation or the publisher. What it boils down to is that new tools and technology can make experiences personal again, which redirects the focus to people. And brands that put people first are more likely to succeed in this new environment.  We live in the era of disengagement. It's a world where society has lost faith in the system (politics, work, faith and corporations) but not in the people.   In politics, defections from political parties have doubled in the past 50 years, which is largely because political…