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Showing posts from January, 2016

The Irrational Challenger

Today, irrational is the new normal. People want products and services that break conventions and defy social norms. They have expectations that don't fit the traditional business model and feel irrational. However, they are very real and have created an irrational economy with irrational challengers. To thrive in this new playing field, business needs to be human, irrational. Think about it. Having a concierge to run our weekly errands for $99 month. Alfred. Ordering a healthy and delicious meal ready-to-eat under 7 minutes delivered at your door the next day. Hungryroot. Booking unlimited blowout appointments at salons in Manhattan for just $99 a month. Vive. (A typical blowout cost $40 to $90 inNew York City.) Renting a room on a month-to-month basis without going through the traditional methods of verifying applicants (e.g., two years of tax returns as proof of income).

The Curse of Advertising Resources

With more platforms, more products and more content who are trying to reach a disengaged audience, it is becoming harder and harder for brands to stand out. Conventional practices are no longer working. People don't watch TV as much as they used to, so they don't see commercials.  They don't click on banner ads. They don't pay attention to billboards ads. And they don't trust brands' messages. Part of the problem is that we are too dependent on traditional ad resources, which limits the realm of our creativity. To thrive in this new environment, we, ironically, need the freedom of a tight brief: what can you do with no budget for mass media?  Or limited marketing communications dollars?  To make a comparison, traditional advertising is a lot like countries and economies that rely on oil. This reliance handicaps innovation. Countries with a vast amount of natural resources tend to have (1) less economic growth and (2) worse development rates than other countrie…

Marketing The Unexpected

Today, we live in an age of disengagement.  Consumers are bombarded with close to 30,000 messages a day. People's attention spans are less than 8 seconds. They can't be apart from their phone for more than 6 minutes and check  it up to 150 times a day. And, needless to say, they don't have time for advertisements: they use ad blockers and heavily distrust brands.  So how do brands respond to this new consumer? In times of disengagement, brands need to market the unexpected to get and keep attention.  Marketing the unexpected is about finding the inflection points in the customer journey, points where motivation is high but competition is either low or nonexistent. Targeting a customer at this point of the journey ensures that people will have the attention, motivation, and the ability (simplicity) to perform the desired behavior.  Today, most of our marketing efforts focus on increasing motivation in a familiar environment. We do TV ads that run on expected TV programs. W…