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Showing posts from November, 2016

Digital Inoculation: Resisting Right Wing's Persuasion

"Fake news” is not going away anytime soon. It will probably just get worse. Trump’s latest tweets are an example of this. And as our society becomes more polarized, we are likely to have more fake news and radical messages spread like forest fire because of social media. And while some people might think that fake news doesn't work, psychology, research, and current events would tell us otherwise. So why is fake news so persuasive and impactful? As humans, we are easily swayed by memorable events rather than facts. And those radical events are easier to remember, real or not. In turn, the more we remember them, the more realistic they become.   Adults, for the most part, are capable of forming their opinions and determining fact from fiction. But what about children? If you are a parent worried about your kid getting influenced by these messages online, what do you do? What is the best way to build resistance to false messages?  Below are a couple of techniques for attitude…

How nice people get corrupted in Facebook?

Mark Zuckerburg said that Facebook doesn’t have a fake news problem and, that even if it did, fake news didn’t influence the outcome of this year’s presidential election. I respectfully disagree with him. Here is why. We gather tidbits and knowledge about everyday life through social interactions with other people. This behavior is a nod to the human condition and need to talk with others as a means of making sense of our world and our place within it. In short, people don’t construct reality by themselves. So where do people go to have these conversations? For the most parts, these conversations happen on social media. Americans spend an alarming amount of time checking social media on their phones. People in the U.S. check their Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts a 17 times a day. That means that at least once every hour that a person is awake, they’re scanning their newsfeeds and interacting with others on social media. As a result, people learn a lot (whether consc…

The Rise of Radical Brands

Social sentiment, ideology, and culture are manifested through different forms of communication, from graffiti to personal style to journalism. Regardless of the means, through communication, we can see how society is growing together or growing apart. In light of recent world events, communications have shown how polarized our society has become, which is made evident through radical messaging. If there is something that we can learn from this year’s Presidential election it is that our country is more divided than ever. We are becoming a tale of two Americas. There is the red state and then there’s the blue state, both with different social, political and economics views. And many of us are left wondering: How do these societal shifts impact brands and the way in which they communicate with a divided country? To stay relevant brands tend to mirror popular culture, which is the dominant share of values and beliefs within society. Consequently, cultural hegemony appears in advertisin…

The New Media Reality

In today's connected world, it's not how much you pay; it is how much coverage you get. This election will probably go down in history not only as the nastiest one but also as the one won by earned "free" media. Hillary Clinton outspent Donald Trump in the airways by a margin of 5-1. Total Clinton camp spent $156 million versus $33 million from team Trump. However, when you add earned media to the mix, it is not even close. According to data-driven analytics firm mediaQuant, Trump received around $5 billion in free media coverage, more than twice that garnered by Clinton. Putting aside the message, we can say that media obsession with Donald Trump helps him get elected. Donald Trump might hate the media, but they are both winners in this election. Trump got more coverage than any other candidate. The media in return benefits from Trump ratings. Total primetime viewership was up 50% from last year across CNN, Fox News and MSNBC, and viewership in the lucrative 25-54 …

Marketing in Times of Trump

Does the message mirror the people? Or do the people mirror the message? Trump won this week. He embraces values that I detest. Americans, at least, the half that supported Trump, did not vote for bullying, bigotry, racism, and violence. I believe that our society is better than that. The vast majority voted against the establishment. They voted for the promise of change that they have yet to see. The sad part is that these are the people, who were more likely to lose from the Trump policies. They might lose healthcare, education, and social services. I am hoping that I am wrong, but past behavior tends to be the best predictor of future conduct. And, Trump has not the best track record. There is a moral to this story, which is the need for empathy in our society. We will remain a divided nation as long we don't put ourselves in other people's shoes. We need to see the world through the eyes of those who are different from us to get it and act. Pete Thiel is right when he said …