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Showing posts from February, 2017

Invisible Ads, Illusionary Marketing

Invisible ads are digital ads that people don't see or recall. They can take many shapes or forms; Banners, pre-roll video ad, pop-up ads, and high-impact take over. They share the same traits; Irrelevant, intrusive and indifferent. When offering the chance, people opt for skipping the ads or blocking it all together. Ninety percent of individuals skip pre-roll ads appearing ahead of online video content and TV show. When offering no choice, people view and forget about them. Sixty-eight percent of people recall less than five ads they’ve seen in the past week. Invisible ads have a devastating power, Juniper Research estimated in a recent study that digital publishers stand to lose more than $27 billion by 2020. They create illusionary marketing; Brands overestimating their advertising and ability to change behavior. The problem is not that people hate ads, they just hate bad, intrusive and annoying ads. We have been applying mass principles to digital. We do tv ads on pre-roll v…

Creating a Behavior Intervention Plan for Your Brand

Is your brand misbehaving? Is your audience not responding to your brand message as desired? Perhaps, you should consider creating a behavior intervention plan (BIP) for your brand. Behavior plans are a useful classroom management tool for students engaging in inappropriate classroom behavior. They serve to teach and reinforce positive behaviors and are a way of documenting the success of the intervention. We can apply the same principles to brands. After all, we are in the business of changing behavior; We want people to buy our products, purchase more, stop or increase a particular conduct. While this might have been hard to pull off a few years ago, today's data and technology allow us to simulate a classroom environment. We can use social network platforms such as Facebook to target behaviors at the micro-moment level and create proactive and reactive strategies to modify our audience behavior. Changing behavior is hard. We are human, imperfect and irrational. Data and techno…

Open Brands; Living in a State of Constant Change

Today's businesses have two ways to compete in the digital economy with an open or a closed brand system. Open brand systems are integrated, fast, and participatory. Closed systems are fragmented, slow, and controlled. The more brands adopt an open model in their services, people, and communications, the more resilient they become in the digital economy. A closed system cannot keep up with today's speed of change, which is claiming business everywhere. The problem is that most brands are still operating in a hybrid and closed system. They control the message, they are structured in departments, and their offering isn't flexible enough to meet new customer expectations. To move to an open system, we need to embrace constant change. We need to create story engines that are always evolving, breaking with department structures, and ending the ownership of our services. Open communication: Creating story engines Open communication is participatory and self-regulated. Brand play…

The Digital Immigrant: The Economics of Digital Goods

There is no doubt that social networks have made the diasporas closer to home. I remember when I first came to this country as a student 17 years ago. At that time, I had to buy phone cards every week to call my family. Now, I connect with them for free almost on a daily basis through social networks or Skype. Furthermore, I keep in touch with friends across the world. New media has empowered immigrants to go beyond a simple phone conversation. Now, they are in social networks and are sending pictures and videos via smartphones. Their families and friends at home are also consuming digital goods from the US. This new dynamic has created a digital immigrant: An immigrant who is not physically in their home country but continues to consume culture, ideas and digital goods from home. I wonder what is the impact of this immigration? Are people more connected to their home countries? Are these virtual immigrants also consuming digital goods and ideas from abroad, by watching videos online…